Trust Me, Trust Me, Trust Me

In case you haven’t been really keeping up with what’s hot and not in anime fandoms over the past year (to be honest, I wouldn’t blame you in the slightest if you weren’t), DRRR!! was quite the hot property which seemed to dominate the season it aired in. The fandom for it exploded. And there was one particular reason why that happened. It wasn’t because of the unpredictable storyline, endearing characters, or even all of the Baccano! references. It was a due to one certain pairing, between a phone smashing informant and a bartender who can’t control his temper. Fujoshi locked into it, and the reaction was immense. Sprawling onto Pixiv and all corners of the net, people were showing their love for that particular pairing. Fueling the fujoshi fire, the author of the novels actually wrote a one shot moment depicting a yaoi scene between the two. It turned out to be a delusion by one of the characters, but it was still canon. A few months back, a drama CD with only their seiyuu had them being asked, in character, various questions about the other such as, ‘what you do you think their sleeping face looks like?’.

Of course, with all hot BL tinged property, doujin games were surely going to be made.

The following two games were made by RH, who have also made a DRRR!! doujin, and a CD. The first game of theirs I looked at was Perverted Lust (PL). Classy. But despite its name, there was none of it the trial. The most NSFW event which occurred had Izaya and Shizuo smoking. Oh, the humanity.

PL doesn’t have any especially unique premise. You see events through the eyes of the sly Izaya, who’s, typically, attempting to escape from the gruff Shizuo. He eventually catches up with them, and the pair start taking shots at each other, both verbally and physically. It all gets a bit messed up when they suddenly notice that chains are wrapped around their necks. They pass out, and wake up in an unknown apartment in Ikebukuro devoid of any colour, almost resembling a hospital. We’ve no question marked face assassins here – as their captors are faces they know very well. Their mutual friend Shinra, and his darling Celty have captured the pair. Their reason? To make them finally get along. Of course, the pair are having none of it and are rather reluctant at the start. Not at all surprising, considering that they’re in a suffocatingly small space with the person they despise. The goal of the game is to skillfully find an escape route, without anything going wrong.

Shizuo and Izaya’s snipping is the key factor in what drives their relationship. We’ve the taunting Izaya who’s rather full of himself in one corner, and we’ve the somewhat slow and violent Shizuo on the other. Their venom filled conversations were believable, with their mutual hatred (and slight awkwardness) coming across well. Shinra and Celty were also cute together, with Shinra happily delivering his adorably cheesy lines (“Oh, Celty! The power of your love can heal me!”), and Celty quickly setting him straight (by kicking him). Unfortunately, there are no character sprites for the two, and instead are represented by a TV screen which is in the apartment where Izaya and Shizuo are held captive.

The art is adequate, and not especially painful to look at. There’s an amateurish look about the sprites and CGs with oddly shaped faces, and blockish shading. It’s not as if the pair have overly complicated character designs, so making them look visually appealing couldn’t really be that difficult. Surely the art would be appealing to some, but I’m not a fan. Even the backgrounds weren’t anything special. The wall of the room that they’re in is horribly plain, and looks weirdly 2D. Having the sprites in front of it does not help. The music was standard enough.

As I mentioned earlier, the goal of the game is to escape the room that Izaya and Shizuo are in. Towards the end of the trial there are choices to be made, and one of the two are always unable to be selected, forcing you to make the incorrect choice for the sake of the trial which has a typically bad end. After the game, there’s this silly omake section in which Izaya has a conversation with you in a lush looking room, reminiscent of some cheesy otome scene. It opens up by a CG of him – I’m absolutely serious – winking. At one point he even asks if the player is underage. I’m sure that some people would be swooning by this stage, but I was wondering was that just it.

PL isn’t really worth your time unless you’re an Izaya/Shizuo fan, and even then if you were only planning on reading this for the H-scenes, then you’ll be disappointed as there are none. The full game was released during October’s Comic City Spark 5, but the trial can be downloaded right here.

Like PL, I thought that Halloween Party was going to be another VN. Sure, we’re in the midst of Spring and I was feeling a bit off getting ready to play something so obviously Hallowe’en tinged, but when in Rome, eh? To my surprise, it wasn’t a VN at all. Instead, it was a silly romaji word game. Izaya was your host, and briefly told you (yes, you right there) how to play the game, and then went on to say that the goal of the game would be to (unsurprisingly) give Shizuo a bit of a fright. And, that if the player got a high enough score, maybe see an embarrassing side of Shizuo. Typing games aren’t things that I can appreciate, as they remind me of my frustration a few years back when playing a silly anime opening typing game. I don’t think I’ll ever recover from feverishly sliding my fingers all over my keyboard trying to keep up with the energetic ‘もってけ!セーラーふく’. Needless to say, I didn’t do all that well in this so wasn’t able to see the final scene. Oh, well. It’s not a great loss or anything.

The trial can be downloaded over at RH’s site. I wonder why it was labeled as being a trial, when that seems to be… it. Just silly word games. But then again, for all I know the trial version could have just had Shizuo blushing profusely before ending, whereas the full version could have a H-scene.

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